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Research Area: Viruses

  1. Professor Raina Plowright

    Raina Plowright

    Our lab seeks to understand and prevent spillover of zoonotic pathogens from wildlife to other species. We develop the science of pandemic prevention through collaborative, transdisciplinary science. We work in the field, the lab, and in silico, all with a commitment to translate the science[...]
  2. Andrew Flyak

    The Flyak lab studies human antibody response to viral pathogens. We try to answer questions like, how do human antibodies neutralize rapidly mutating viruses? And, how can we design vaccines that mimic effective antibody responses seen in some individuals? In our lab, we isolate antibodies[...]
  3. Scott Keith, CIHMID Postdoctoral Fellow

    Scott Keith

    Scott’s research investigates how endocrine signaling networks regulate animals’ physiological responses to pathogenic microbes. He uses the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster as a genetically tractable model to investigate the mechanisms by which several key insect hormones and their cognate nuclear receptors both directly and indirectly[...]
  4. Dr. Jaehee Kim

    Jaehee Kim

    The Kim Lab focuses on the general fields of population genetics and evolutionary biology. Dr. Kim is interested in computational problems relevant to understanding evolutionary processes and population dynamics, and in development and application of statistical methods for inference from genetic data. In addition to[...]
  5. Dr. Sarah Caddy

    Sarah Caddy

    We study positive and negative interactions between viruses and antibodies. We are particularly interested in maternal antibodies, which are transferred from mother to infant to protect against neonatal infections. However, these antibodies can also block the infant response to vaccines. Despite this phenomenon being identified[...]
  6. Deborah Fowell, Microbiology & Immunology

    Deborah Fowell

    We are actively engaged in defining the signals that enable effector T cells to ‘find’ areas of infection and damage within inflamed tissues. We utilize intravital multiphoton microscopy and optogenetic tools to visualize and manipulate effector CD4+ T cells in situ. These approaches have revealed extrinsic[...]
  7. Brandon Hollingsworth, CIHMID Postdoctoral Fellow

    Brandon Hollingsworth

    I am interested in finding better ways of controlling the mosquito Aedes aegypti, the main vector of dengue and Zika viruses. Specifically, I am interested in determining how they move through their environment and the effect that has on different control strategies. The mosquito virome, the[...]
  8. Gabrielle Le-Bury

    Macrophages are susceptible to HIV-1 infection and are resistant to virally-induced cell death. Alveolar macrophages (AM) in particular are known to be extremely long-lived and self-renewing, and have been shown to be both permissive to HIV-1 infection and persist in the face of Anti-Retroviral Therapy[...]
  9. Luis Schang, Microbiology and Immunology

    Luis Schang

    Dr. Schang uses small molecules with drug-like properties to probe the ways viruses cause infections. He is most interested in finding common features among the many viruses that cause disease in animals or humans, including how they enter cells and how they replicate and cause[...]
  10. David Russell, Microbiology and Immunology

    David Russell

    My program is focused on drug discovery and the pathogenesis of infectious human disease. We work closely with the Gates Foundation and the California Institute for Biomedical Research to run high-throughput drug screening on Mycobacterium tuberculosis within the context of the host. We also have human subjects[...]