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Research Area: Bacteria

  1. Marian Schmidt, Microbiology

    Marian Schmidt

    Climate change dramatically impacts freshwater ecosystems, which are becoming warmer, more acidic, and nutrient rich. The collective influence of the microbial inhabitants of these ecosystems, despite their tiny size, can have an immense impact on water quality. However, we lack fundamental knowledge on the ecology[...]
  2. Deborah Fowell, Microbiology & Immunology

    Deborah Fowell

    We are actively engaged in defining the signals that enable effector T cells to ‘find’ areas of infection and damage within inflamed tissues. We utilize intravital multiphoton microscopy and optogenetic tools to visualize and manipulate effector CD4+ T cells in situ. These approaches have revealed extrinsic[...]
  3. Kelsi Sandoz, Population Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences

    Kelsi Sandoz

    Research in my lab probes the environmental, structural and physiological basis of bacterial survival. The majority of earth’s microbes exist in a non-growing, surival state, making it important to better understand the mechanisms underpinning this physiological state. We primarily use the environmental zoonotic pathogen, Coxiella burnetii (causative agent[...]
  4. Heather Feaga, Microbiology

    Heather Feaga

    The Feaga lab is focused on how bacteria maintain protein synthesis capacity under stress. We aim to identify factors that interact with the ribosome and prevent stalling, and to understand the impact of ribosome stalling on cell physiology. In particular, we are interested in how[...]
  5. Jon Sanders

    Why do some gut bacteria stick to one host species, while others seem to hop around freely between them? What changes in their genomes when they move between hosts? And how can we begin to develop the data and tools we need to study these[...]
  6. Frank Schroeder, Boyce Thompson Institute

    Frank Schroeder

    Our research is directed at characterizing structures and biological function of biogenic small molecules (BSMs) that regulate development and immune responses in plants and animals and serve important functions with associated microbiota. Using comparative metabolomic approaches we have engaged in a comprehensive effort to characterize[...]
  7. Luis Schang, Microbiology and Immunology

    Luis Schang

    Dr. Schang uses small molecules with drug-like properties to probe the ways viruses cause infections. He is most interested in finding common features among the many viruses that cause disease in animals or humans, including how they enter cells and how they replicate and cause[...]
  8. David Russell, Microbiology and Immunology

    David Russell

    My program is focused on drug discovery and the pathogenesis of infectious human disease. We work closely with the Gates Foundation and the California Institute for Biomedical Research to run high-throughput drug screening on Mycobacterium tuberculosis within the context of the host. We also have human subjects[...]
  9. Gary Whittaker, Microbiology and Immunology

    Gary Whittaker

    My lab has a broad interest in the structure and function of viral envelope proteins, and how genomic mutations lead to changes in the envelope proteins and control viral pathogenesis. We primarily study influenza viruses of humans and animals, and coronaviruses, principally, SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV and[...]
  10. Maren Vitousek, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

    Maren Vitousek

    My lab studies how stress and social interactions alter the biological state of organisms that experience them. Much of our work uses free-living passerine birds, including tree swallows, as model systems to test the neuroendocrine, epigenetic, and gut microbial impacts of stress and social connectedness,[...]